Posts

Occupy Science! (Javier Rodríguez Laguna, April 2015)

‘Science is anarchist’ according to Javier Rodríguez Laguna, Researcher at Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia. Yet it seems that ‘we have accepted to many unnescessary power structures’ Is it time for science to open up and follow in the tracks in the free software community?

Natural history research—a supply and demand industry? (James O’Hanlon, March 2015)

We have a product: popular science communication. And we have a market: the public. Can there be a business model that caters for this demand? James O’Henlon, Australian zoologist, raises the question whether exploratory research should be driven by a supply and demand mechanism.

Break the mold with a graphical abstract (Luc Cox, February 2015)

Graphical abstracts is one of many ways to adapt scientific communication to a quickly evolving media landscape. Luk Cox, scientific illustrator with a background in molecular biology, has a clear message: it is time for old dogs to learn some new tricks.

There are no projects like side projects (Piotr Migdał, January 2015)

Piotr Migdał, data science freelancer from Poland, has a strong belief in side projects as these tend to support free thinking and serendipity. Everywhere he looks, side projects are associated with great stuff.

Disseminate the scientists—and the science will follow (Richard Andersson, December 2014)

Richard Andersson, a postdoctoral researcher in neurobiology from Stockholm, is worried about the gap between politics and science. How do we empower decision makers to make choices about our future which are based on science and logic? The…

Can women be professors? (Sara Torstensson, November 2014)

Sara Torstensson, a biomed student from Stockholm with a passion for questions regarding gender equality, wonders which attitudes we are passing on to our children and how this affecs the inequality in academia.

Classical peer review: Where is the evidence? (Joshua Nicholson, October 2014)

Has classical peer review really been proven to work? In our first monthly Crastina Column, Joshua Nicholson from The Winnover shares his doubts with us.