Posts

Girls in STEM: brain, farts, and a female science comedian

The forthcoming science comedy show for girls, Science with Sophie, has a simple message: any girl can find science around her, and be a brave, curious, silly and smart scientist. Crastina’s Julia Turan had a chat with the creator Sophie…

The Science comedian list

As the theme of Crastina this month is the art of using humour to get your message across, I have a suggestion: let’s make a list together with science and tech people — former or current — who are also working in comedy. (Other performers…

Science communication is no joke. But it should be (Dean Burnett, September 2015)

Some people in the scientific community think that humour shouldn’t be involved in communicating science. Here, Dr. Dean Burnett—who is a neuroscientist, stand-up comedian and belongs to the blog team of The Guardian–explains why they are wrong.

Mirja Hagström “Instead of getting annoyed, is there anything I can do about this misconception?”

Every Christmas, a botanical misconception keeps irritating biology interested people: the stuff Swedes put in their candle holders is not ”white moss”, it is a lichen! Mirja Hagström decided to put things straight with a YouTube video

Sarah Sherwood, IRB Barcelona: “We wanted to do it in a different way, and chose to dance.”

Scientists at IRB Barcelona wanted to raise awareness and support for research into cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes. The result: a very professional and captivating video, full of happy dance moves.

Colette Renier, European Commission: “Do not underestimate the value of humour in communication!”

Tomorrow night, September 26, is Researcher's Night. In several hundred cities across Europe, scientists are reaching out with ”popular science and fun learning” – offering lectures, workshops, guided tours and science shows.

The Lab—a comedy series about graduate students working in a science lab

Made by science people, for science people, the YouTube sitcom The Lab has a high recognition factor. Two episodes have been published so far on YouTube, filled with clever observations on conflicting personalities, cultural oddities and academic hierarchies.