Posts

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Using the 5 Ws for Science Writing

Science writing, in some respects, is no different to other types of journalistic writing. It is about: Who?, What?, Why?, When?, Where? and (w)How? Who? It is helpful to contextualise any story, we want to know which genius is responsible…
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Analogies—when two similar worlds meet

Properly used, analogies can give a huge help for understanding the structure of what we are telling each other. But then again: which is the proper way to use them? Norbert Majubu offers some reflections on how people often misuse analogies in science communication and reasoning.

”Don’t write a word unless you have something to contribute”

Marc Bousquet, associate professor of English at Emory University, recently wrote a comment worth considering in The Chronicle of Higher Education: Keep the ‘Research,’ Ditch the ‘Paper’
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Getting your motor running: how to start a presentation

Giving momentum. That’s what you are doing when you are start talking to your fellows (or professors …). You are igniting their minds and curiosity just like you ignite your car when you start driving. Now, there are different…

A Very Impressing Word (just for fun!)

Here is a word first used by the Noble Prize winner (in Literature) T.S. Eliot which may be of immense use for young science communicators.

The Eloquent Science Interview

A major source of inspiration for Scientia Crastina is Eloquent Science which is both a book and a blog—together they are compulsory reading for the early career scientist interested in modern communication. Scientia Crastina sent some…