Long and short interviews with communicators in the field of science and science dissemination, some of them talented and prominent, some of them just talented–but they all have important things to tell us.

Andreas Møgelhøj, The Geek That Speaks: ”My dream is to create a tech talk revolution”

Andreas Møgelhøj, Danish chemist and physicist, presents some really inspiring videos on the art of tech talks exploring themes like ”The Curse of Knowledge” and the ”Big Picture Secret”.

Donna Yates, Lego Academics: ”Don't be afraid to try out an idea, even if it is silly”

Life as an academia is described in a very special way by Donna Yates, creator of the Twitter hit @LegoAcademics. The formula is quite simple: a set of Research Institute Lego, Twitter, professional experience – and a lot of humour and wit.
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Reddit: a quickstart kit for science people

The social news website Reddit is becoming more and more influential. With the help of Reddit's director of communication, Victoria Taylor, we will try to explain the scope of the service, how it is useful for scientists and how you should get started.
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LinkedIn champion publishes weekly link tips about science communication

The Week’s Top Science Communication Stories is a weekly link list published on LinkedIn by Kirk Englehardt at Georgia Tech—a true LinkedIn champion who demonstrates the true potential of this media platform.
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”If you talk to the press, people might offer you gold mines”

Popular science twitterer @AstroKatie, a.k.a. Katherine J Mack, gave an interview for the Economist and then received a request from a firm looking for a use for an exhausted goldmine–something may be just the right kind of environment for a astro physics lab!
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How to succeed in interviews—some reflections by an experienced expert reviewer

To succeed in interviews, you need to show genuine interest, stay present in the moment and demonstrate your self-awareness. Professor Helena Jernberg Wiklund shares some of her experience .
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Combining science promotion & data collection

Each year, the Swedish organisation VA organises a public mass experiment—an activity that combines science promotion among school children with data collection. Hence, last fall 10 000 Swedish pupils documented the changes to the autum leaves of trees all over Sweden.